Advisor Dr. Robert Stickgold is an associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and director of the Center for Sleep and Cognition. His research focuses on the nature of cognition during sleep. Here’s what he had to say about quality versus quantity of sleep.

When your alarm buzzes in the morning, before you even ask yourself “Do I really have to get up?” you’re likely assessing “How did I sleep?” If you can barely open your eyes to silence your alarm, chances are you slept poorly. If you pop out of bed with an extra pep in your step as you head for that first cup of coffee, it’s a good bet that you slept well. 

So which is better –  6 restful hours of sleep or 9 full hours of tossing and turning? Quality versus quantity - the age old question. The best indication of sleep quality is how you feel in the morning. The better you feel in the AM, the more restorative your sleep likely was in the PM.

When you’re getting quality sleep, you’re likely achieving more deep and REM sleep. These later cycles of sleep are necessary for your body and brain to get the restorative effects of sleep including learning, memory and mood. 

At Remrise, our mission is to get you higher quality sleep, night after night. By supporting the body to transition into a calmer, sleep-ready state, our formulas prime you for an optimal wake up call in the morning. You’ll know Remrise is working when you wake up feeling pleasantly surprised at how rejuvenated and well-rested you are. Which likely means you slept deeply and likely got more REM sleep. 

So do the number of hours you sleep really count toward “good sleep”? not necessarily. It’s all about quality. Quality sleep. Quality product. Quality ingredients. That said, the key to getting better sleep long-term is consistently good habits: Taking Remrise daily and practicing good sleep hygiene before you turn in at night.

In the words of our advisor Dr. Robert Stickgold, an associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and director of the Center for Sleep and Cognition:

I’ve been studying sleep for more than 30 years. The best indication of sleep quality is how you feel in the morning. The better you feel in the morning the more restorative your sleep was. 

We need sleep for our health. Not just any sleep, we need quality sleep. It matters how much quality sleep you get. That’s what ties to health.”